Heart disease is at an all-time hight and the costs of health care constantly increasing every year.  A root cause of this epidemic is obesity, with a vast majority of Americans constantly struggling with their weight.  The world around us has become “super-sized”, including the plates we eat on, which are 51% larger than the ones we commonly used 50 years ago.  Livliga is introduces us to a concept of right-sized portion guiding dinnerware, promoting a healthy lifestyle with an emphasis on upscale design and style.

Livliga, founded in early 2011 in Boulder, Colorado, was conceived out of a personal desire to find a solution to our supersized eating epidemic. Sheila Kemper Dietrich, Livliga Founder and CEO, recognized the need to “right-size” the food environment and set off to develop a suite of everyday products to support a healthy lifestyle.  Livliga is Swedish for LIVELY, VIBRANT, or VIVID.  The dinner ware is for everyone looking for a beautiful, yet subtle way to improve and control their food environment.

Parmesan Baked Crispy Green Beans using Halsa Dinnerware.

Homemade Parmesan Baked Crispy Green Beans, with Chipolte & Rasberry Ketchup – On Halsa Dinnerware.

We recently used the Hälsa dinnerware in our kitchen.  Hälsa, which means “good health” in Swedish, is a bold design in various hues of blue with a lively and stylish pattern, encouraging a healthy and mindful way of eating in supporting a vibrant lifestyle.  The dinnerware was perfect for our Homemade Parmesan Baked Crispy Green Beans, with Chipolte & Raspberry Ketchup, a healthy yet fun snack to enjoy just about any time of the year.  The Hälsa dinnerware helped to make the delicious snack look plentiful, while giving an attractive presentation.  Instead of filling an over sized plate with unhealthy junk food, we enjoyed our snack all while being mindful of the fulfillment and satisfaction we had of a healthier option.  

Each piece of Livliga dinnerware is designed to look striking as a suite of dishware. Each dish also has its own unique portion indicators to guide you in using the right amount of food as described by a recipe or single serving noted on the side of a package. In addition to its beautiful design the 4 piece place setting is right-sized which means they are smaller than the average dinnerware sold today.  All are proportionally designed with wide rims so when you put the right-sized food portions on your plate and in your bowl or mug it will look like “enough” so that at the end of your meal you will feel satisfied.

The 4 piece, single place setting includes: - Dinner Plate - Luncheon / Salad Plate - Cereal / Soup Bowl - Mug List Price: $59.95 Introductory Price: $49.95

The 4 piece, single place setting includes:
– Dinner Plate
– Luncheon / Salad Plate
– Cereal / Soup Bowl
– Mug
List Price: $59.95
Introductory Price: $49.95
Features
The dinner plate has 5 measurements on it. The largest circle is for your vegetable or fruit and designates a 1 cup measurement. The icon with 2 circles indicates a ¾ cup serving as well as a ½ cup serving which are typical serving sizes for the starch or grain in a given meal. The squared icon is for your protein and is typically between 2–6 ounces. The smallest icon is a “dollop” and measures ⅛ cup (2 tablespoons) of sauce, condiment, salad dressing or jam.
The salad/dessert plate has 3 measurements on it. The largest icon is a double circle with the outer circle being a ¾ cup serving and the inner circle providing a ½ cup measure. There is a separate ⅛ cup (2 tablespoons) icon as well on the plate.
The bowl is proportionally right-sized to accommodate a 1 cup serving (8 ounces) as well as a 1 ½ cup serving (12 ounces), depending on the meal and recipe used.
The mug is designed to accommodate a right-sized single serving amount of 8 ounces to be used for your morning “joe” or tea or hot chocolate or for any other drink you prefer to place in a mug.

 

Fact Sheet

  • More than one-third of American adults, or about 78 million individuals, were obese in 2009-2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control.  A Duke University study forecasts that 32 million more people could be obese by the year 2030.
  • The average American Dinner plate has grown by almost 51% since 1900, with plates expanding from 9.6 inches to nearly a foot in diameter.
  • The 4 piece place setting is right-sized which means they are smaller than the average dinnerware sold today. Each piece also has its own unique portion size indicators to guide in using the right amount of food as indicated by a recipe or single serving noted on the side of a package.
  • Livliga dinnerware is defined as artist-designed, beautiful place settings that allow for easy “right-sizing” of portions and an easier path to a healthy lifestyle.
  • The Livliga Dinnerware 16 piece set, service for four includes 4 dinner plates, salad/luncheon plates, bowls and mugs, and is offered in two different patterns. It is also possible to purchase 4 piece individual place settings.
  • The dinnerware was the first of a collection of products, which now includes a children’s line, a children’s book, etched glassware and serveware.
  • Kidliga is the children’s dishware set that offers visual cues to guide kids to serve themselves just-right portions on their plates at every meal. The accompanying award winning children’s book, Sammie & Sax in the Land of Quinoa: The Search for a Balanced Meal, is a fun, engaging, well-designed teaching tool, providing subtle lessons about a balanced meal, recipes, and a teaching guide.
  • Sheila Kemper Dietrich created the first prototype, and by using it, she and her husband lost more than 50 pounds each.
  • Livliga is available online on the company website at www.LivligaHome.com at an introductory price of $49.95.
  • Livliga is a name that comes from a Swedish word meaning LIVELY, VIBRANT or VIVID.

To learn more about Livliga visit: www.LivligaHome.com to order your set and being your healthy lifestyle today!

Livliga – Overview video

 

About The Author

Hayden Walker
Executive Editor | Co-Publisher
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Hayden Walker is the Editor in Chief and Director of Operations for Austin Food Magazine

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