The 8th Annual Bug Eating Festival moves to local hangout in.gredients! Bring the kids! Bring yourself! Bring your appetite! We’re gonna eat bugs!

Entomophagy, better known as insect eating, is practiced by cultures all over the world, some estimates say up to 80% of the countries in the world have traditionally seen insects as just another food. We’re actually the odd ones for NOT eating bugs.

Why?! Because insects are nutritious, environmentally friendly and delicious!

We know what you’re thinking, and that’s ok! We understand that this is a new (and exciting!) idea to a lot of people; that’s why we make it easy to try the first bite and get over the mental hurdle. If you’re going to join the growing number of people eating bugs for a better tomorrow, why not do it in a fun and family-friendly environment with other first time insect eaters. You can try them freshly cooked in their whole form, or try a variety of goodies made with cricket powder!

Or maybe you were bummed that you missed your chance to try a Cricket Taco at Odd Duck, Cricket Avocado Salad at Dai Due or Cricket Mortadella at Salt & Time…never fear!

Little Herds is teaming up again with the festival’s founders, Marjory Wildcraft and Allen (Alio) Davisson, for an amazing evening that you and your kids will be remember for the rest of your lives. Learn about edible insects and which cultures enjoy them, how to prepare them, and even where to find them; try samples of locally made insect snacks; watch a live cooking demonstration and try the bugs straight from the frying pan. Our presenting sponsors and local supporters are in.gredients and Aspire Food Group USA, with additional support from Hopper Foods and Crickers; drink specials from Thirsty Planet Brewing Company benefiting Little Herds with your liquid courage; and Art.Science.Gallery will be bringing out some insect-inspired art to share.

The Bug Festival will be Saturday June 6th, 5pm-8pm at in.gredients at 2610 Manor Road, Austin TX 78722. It’s open to the public and free (with a suggested donation to Little Herds at the door), and cameras or recording devices are allowed. For more information, visit the event page at:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1398166467176502/

 

“It started as a small gathering behind my barn” says Marjory Wildcraft, the founder of the 8th Annual Bug Eating Festival which will be held at a new location this year, in.gredients, on June 6th. “It’s just crazy how many people are into it now”.

Wildcraft likens eating a cricket to riding a roller coaster. “At first you are saying no, no. no as the insect gets closer to your mouth. Then you actually eat it, and it tastes… sort of good. Then you get this rush of relief. It’s a ride.” says Wildcraft.

A love / hate relationship with eating insects.

Marjory Wildcraft is best known for her radio and television segments teaching people to “Grow Your Own Groceries”, showing people how to produce half their own food in less than an hour per day.

Marjory wanted to explore food possibilities beyond gardens and small livestock. “I knew that insects are eaten all over the world, are rich in minerals, and have those precious omega fatty acids we all need. But I just never could get myself to eat them”. “They’re also more efficient than many other types of protein when it come to critical resources like land, water and feed; they also produce a fraction of the greenhouse gas emissions compared to other livestock. They can be raised quickly, prolifically and humanely, without hormones or antibiotics…they’re pretty incredible,” says Robert Nathan Allen of Aspire.

The possibility of a good source of eco-friendly nutritious food was too tempting for Wildcraft. She struck on an idea of throwing a big party and making it fun. Cue Allen Davisson, taking on the chef’s apron for the eighth year running. In between grilling up and passing around plates of freshly cooked bugs, Allen offers the lore of edibility, preparing, cooking, and eating insects.

“The kids are usually crowded in the closest” says Davisson, “they just jump right in there and try everything. I’ve been amazed at how many kids confess they’ve been eating bugs all along”. Kids from all areas and all backgrounds seem to find a common ground in the joys of making Mom and Dad squirm as the chomp down crickets.

Good for growing bodies, good for a growing planet.

About The Author

Hayden Walker
Executive Editor | Co-Publisher
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Hayden Walker is the Editor in Chief and Director of Operations for Austin Food Magazine

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